Publications

Low Carbon Transport on the Move Conference Report

20 August 2015

Hosted by the US Studies Centre in partnership with the NSW Government, the conference brought together experts from the US and Australia from the military, business, government and the scientific communities to address the progress being made towards delivering sustainable alternatives to fossil fuels to the transportation market. Read report

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Beyond food - the rise of the bioeconomy

31 July 2015

Director of the US Studies Centre's Alternative Transport Fuels Initiative Dr Susan Pond contributed a short article for a report on Australia’s Agricultural Future by the Australian Council of Learned Academies. Pond wrote about the increasingly important role of agriculture for the production of building blocks for renewable chemicals, materials and fuels. Read article

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Soil security for a competitive agricultural future

31 July 2015

Director of the US Studies Centre's Soil Carbon Initiative Andrea Koch contributed a short article about soil security for a report on Australia’s Agricultural Future by the Australian Council of Learned Academies. Read article

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How digital infrastructure can substitute for physical infrastructure

14 July 2015

Today digital technology is viewed as additive to the physical world: something that enhances but does not replace the use of physical infrastructure. However, this paper by Hugh Bradlow and Arjun Jayachandra, presented at the Low Carbon Transport on the Move Conference in May 2015, discusses the next wave of digital technology adoption that can potentially be substitutive for physical infrastructure. In particular, the authors examine the impact of emerging information and communications technologies on the demand for roads over the next three to four decades. Read report

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2014 Annual Report

12 June 2015

Read about the Centre's 2014 achievements in our Annual Report. Read report

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Free-Trafe Ideology and Transatlantic Abolitionism: A Historiography

4 June 2015

This essay by Marc-William Palen seeks to trace the many—and often conflicting—economic ideological interpretations of the transatlantic abolitionist impulse. In particular, it explores the contested relationship between free-trade ideology and transatlantic abolitionism, and highlights the understudied influence of Victorian free-trade ideology within the American abolitionist movement. By bringing together historiographical controversies from the American and British side, the essay calls into question long-standing conceptions regarding the relationship between free trade and abolitionism, and suggests new avenues for research. Read article

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Monitor Soil Degradation or Triage for Soil Security? An Australian Challenge

29 April 2015

In this issue of SustainabilityAndrea Koch, Adrian Chappell, Michael Eyres and Edward Scott propose the adoption of a triaging approach to soil degradation using the soil security framework, to prioritise treatment plans that engage science and agriculture to develop practices that simultaneously increase productivity and improve soil condition. They argue that this will provide a public policy platform for efficient allocation of public and private resources to secure Australia’s soil resource. Read article

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Australia Matters for America

24 March 2015

The Australia Matters for America/America Matters for Australia report is part of the Asia Matters for America initiative at the East-West Center in Washington. This edition was produced in partnership with the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney and the Perth USAsia Centre at the University of Western Australia. Read online

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Book Review: Sino–US Relations and the Role of Emotion in State Action

3 February 2015

PhD candidate David Howell reviews Sino–US Relations and the Role of Emotion in State Action: Understanding Post–Cold War Crisis Interactions by Taryn Shepperd. Read review

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The Imperialism of Economic Nationalism, 1890–1913

13 January 2015

by Marc-William Palen

Debunking the common laissez-faire myth surrounding turn-of-the-century American foreign relations allows for a reconceptualisation of American imperialism from 1890 to 1913. The Republican Party, the party of protectionism, found itself riven by internal disagreements over the future of the protectionist system and US imperial expansion. From within Republican protectionist ranks arose a progressive wing that increasingly looked beyond the home market for the country’s growing American agricultural and manufacturing surpluses. They did so against staunch anti-imperial opposition not only from American free-trade independents, but also from the Republican Party’s isolationist home-market protectionists, who yet feared or disdained foreign markets and colonial acquisitions. These progressive Republican proponents of empire combined coercive trade reciprocity with protectionism—an expansive closed door—and worked hard to extend American imperial power through informal means of high tariff walls, closed US-controlled markets, and retaliatory reciprocity if possible, by formal annexation and military interventionism when necessary. The American Empire thus arose owing to the imperialism of economic nationalism, not the imperialism of free trade. Read article

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