Public Knowledge Forum

Tags: Journalism, Public Knowledge Forum, The Media

4 November 2013

Time: 11:00am - 10:30pm

Location: Sydney Opera House

Website: http://publicknowledgeforum.org/

PKFDramatic shifts in the media industry threaten traditional reporting. What is the new journalism, does it inform the public, and what does this mean for democracy?

This November, the Public Knowledge Forum brought together distinguished opinion leaders from technology, politics, and the press to help answer pressing questions about the future of journalism and its impact on governance and public policy. How has the technological and economic disruption of the media business affected journalism’s ability to hold institutions accountable? In a world of fragmented audiences and time-shifted media consumption, can the new media still create the common pool of knowledge on which democratic self-government depends? Is our usage of the internet as a platform for news degrading or enhancing the quality of our public conversations?

Launching with Life after truth: The death of journalism and what this means for democracy, presented in conjunction with the Festival of Dangerous Ideas, the Forum presented a full day of lively and challenging panel discussions, and the opportunity to be part of the audience for the ABC's Q&A program, which was broadcast live from the Sydney Opera House.

Visit the Public Knowledge Forum website for more information.

Watch the opening remarks from the conference below and view all the sessions on our YouTube channel.

VIDEOS & INTERVIEWS

Bates Gill

China–US relations strained by jet encounter

CEO Bates Gill discusses the growing rift between China and the US sparked by a close encounter between American surveillance planes and Chinese fighter jets over the South China Sea.


Russell Trood

US marines in Australia spark debate

With the latest AUSMIN talks cementing an agreement to base 2,500 US marines in Darwin by 2017, Australia's north has become the focus of a debate around defence spending and priorities. Adjunct professor with the Centre's Defence and Security Program Russell Trood joins an expert panel to discuss the issue.

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