Memory, Place and Diaspora: Five US-based artists speak

3 July 2012

Time: 6:00pm - 7:15pm

The Leaf Effect: study for transmission #10The US Studies Centre was delighted to host a special event for the Biennale of Sydney, in conjunction with the National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA) at the College of Fine Arts (COFA), the University of New South Wales (UNSW). Binh Danh, a Vietnamese-American artist who works in photomedia, and the members of Postcommodity (four Native American artists working with installation and sound) presented their work in conversation with Phoebe Scott from the National Art School (NAS) and Brenda L. Croft, Senior Research Fellow, NIEA.

Binh Danh and Postcommodity members Cristóbal Martínez, Kade Twist, Nathan Young and Raven Chacon deal with ideas of memory and displacement engendered by very different historical circumstances: the Vietnam War for Binh Danh, and the loss of traditional American lands and languages for Postcommodity. Their Biennale of Sydney installations are on view at the Art Gallery of NSW.

Professor of Art History, Roger Benjamin from the US Studies Centre, chaired the forum at the University of Sydney.

Panel members:

  • Binh Danh respondent: Phoebe Scott, specialist in 20th Century Vietnamese art, NAS, Sydney.
  • Postcommodity respondent: Brenda L. Croft (Gurindji/Mutpurra), distinguished Indigenous Australian curator and Senior Research fellow, at the NIEA, COFA, UNSW.

 

Co-hosted by:

 

NIEA

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