Journal Articles

4 per 1000 - Soil carbon to mitigate climate change

25 November 2015

Andrea Koch, Alex McBratney and Budiman Minasny investigate the viability of a call by the French Government in the lead up to COP21 to increase carbon in the global soil stock by 4 per cent per annum, based on Australia’s world leading regulatory approach to carbon farming. Read article

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Beyond food - the rise of the bioeconomy

31 July 2015

Director of the US Studies Centre's Alternative Transport Fuels Initiative Dr Susan Pond contributed a short article for a report on Australia’s Agricultural Future by the Australian Council of Learned Academies. Pond wrote about the increasingly important role of agriculture for the production of building blocks for renewable chemicals, materials and fuels. Read article

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Soil security for a competitive agricultural future

31 July 2015

Director of the US Studies Centre's Soil Carbon Initiative Andrea Koch contributed a short article about soil security for a report on Australia’s Agricultural Future by the Australian Council of Learned Academies. Read article

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Free-Trafe Ideology and Transatlantic Abolitionism: A Historiography

4 June 2015

This essay by Marc-William Palen seeks to trace the many—and often conflicting—economic ideological interpretations of the transatlantic abolitionist impulse. In particular, it explores the contested relationship between free-trade ideology and transatlantic abolitionism, and highlights the understudied influence of Victorian free-trade ideology within the American abolitionist movement. By bringing together historiographical controversies from the American and British side, the essay calls into question long-standing conceptions regarding the relationship between free trade and abolitionism, and suggests new avenues for research. Read article

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Monitor Soil Degradation or Triage for Soil Security? An Australian Challenge

29 April 2015

In this issue of SustainabilityAndrea Koch, Adrian Chappell, Michael Eyres and Edward Scott propose the adoption of a triaging approach to soil degradation using the soil security framework, to prioritise treatment plans that engage science and agriculture to develop practices that simultaneously increase productivity and improve soil condition. They argue that this will provide a public policy platform for efficient allocation of public and private resources to secure Australia’s soil resource. Read article

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Book Review: Sino–US Relations and the Role of Emotion in State Action

3 February 2015

PhD candidate David Howell reviews Sino–US Relations and the Role of Emotion in State Action: Understanding Post–Cold War Crisis Interactions by Taryn Shepperd. Read review

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The Imperialism of Economic Nationalism, 1890–1913

13 January 2015

by Marc-William Palen

Debunking the common laissez-faire myth surrounding turn-of-the-century American foreign relations allows for a reconceptualisation of American imperialism from 1890 to 1913. The Republican Party, the party of protectionism, found itself riven by internal disagreements over the future of the protectionist system and US imperial expansion. From within Republican protectionist ranks arose a progressive wing that increasingly looked beyond the home market for the country’s growing American agricultural and manufacturing surpluses. They did so against staunch anti-imperial opposition not only from American free-trade independents, but also from the Republican Party’s isolationist home-market protectionists, who yet feared or disdained foreign markets and colonial acquisitions. These progressive Republican proponents of empire combined coercive trade reciprocity with protectionism—an expansive closed door—and worked hard to extend American imperial power through informal means of high tariff walls, closed US-controlled markets, and retaliatory reciprocity if possible, by formal annexation and military interventionism when necessary. The American Empire thus arose owing to the imperialism of economic nationalism, not the imperialism of free trade. Read article

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Resolving the Difference between Evolutionary Antecedents of Political Attitudes and Sources of Human Variation

4 November 2014

by Adam Lockyer and Peter K. Hatemi

Humans, despite the country they inhabit, the social structures they constitute, and the forms of governments they live under, universally possess political attitudes; that is, those attitudes towards sexual norms, out-groups, resource allocation, cooperation and fairness. It has been proposed that this near universal manifestation across societies remains ingrained in the psychological architecture of humans because of human evolution. However, there is enormous variation in political attitudes within and across populations, and this variation is not merely a function of social differences but derives, in part, through neurobiological differences within human populations. Thus, there is great confusion on the difference between what has evolved as universal, and what is due to individual variation. This confusion, results, in part on the lack of integration of the theoretical mechanisms that addresses how humans vary within evolutionarily adaptive universals. Here we seek to fill this lacuna by explicating how evolutionary biology and psychology account for the universal need for humans to have political attitudes while neurobiological differences account for variation within those evolved structures. Link to publishers

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American Art, Australian Focus, 1945-1975

18 September 2014

A special edition of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Art (Vol 14, Issue 1, 2014), edited by the US Studies Centre's Professor Roger Benjamin has been published. Entitled “American Art, Australian Focus, 1945-1975”, the edition emerges from a series of seminars and conferences supported by the US Studies Centre. Link to journal

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The theater of inequality

19 August 2014

Like the ideology undergirding Occupy Wall Street, Thomas Piketty’s book Capital in the Twenty-First Century exhibits a marked lack of historical consciousness and complexity, writes lecturer Thomas Adams. In this essay, he argues that Piketty confuses capitalism with capitalist social relations, and thus imagines solutions without politics, lacks coherence regarding the necessity for a revaluation of labor and a shrinking of the moral confines of the market, and hopes for a better world sans class politics as a mechanism. Read article

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Next »


Gorana Grgic

Why Obama reversed his stance on Syria

Lecturer Gorana Grgic explains why President Barack Obama changed his tune and announced US troops in Syria.

Omar Offendum

Bridging the Arab-American divide through hip-hop

Centre guest Omar Offendum is a Syrian-American hip-hop artist who uses his music to explore cultural identity and politics in the Middle East.

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